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Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit), The American Dream Is Alie And Well. US Flag, felt, .50 cal ammunition, foam, gold leaf, plastic, 2012.
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Patrick Dean Hubbell (Diné) “HONORING OUR FOREMOTHERS” oil, acrylic, oil stick, charcoal, natural earth pigment on canvas, mounted wood stretcher bar, 2020

Part 1: Remixing

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Merritt Johnson (Mohawk, Blackfoot, Irish, Swedish), Exorcizing America. DIY instructional video, released Feb 13, 2019
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Video stills from Exorcizing America
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Merritt Johnson is also known for weaving bomb-shaped baskets filled with corn kernels — visual reminders that indigeneity is a weapon against colonialism.
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Double Agents

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Navajo Pictorial Weaving and “Curio Loom” from New Mexico
1874
Smithsonian Museum of Natural History
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Jenny Anne Taylor (Uintah Ute), Nations, 2002, glass beads, leather, nylon thread, National Museum of the American Indian
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Taylor used more than 130,000 glass seed beads to make this American flag, which she said was a way to mourn after 9–11.
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Velma Kee Craig (Navajo), BarCode / QR Code Flag, 24” x 16” wool, 2013

No Stars

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Beading and Weaving the Flag

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Lakota moccasins from the 1890s.

The Lakota Flag Mystery

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Lakota Cradleboard Cover, c. 1880

Strategic Failure

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Stars as Crosses

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Not All Natives

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The great Lakota warrior Red Cloud collected flags.
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Before the mid 19th century, the flag could stand for an important event, as we see in Lakota winter counts or pictographic calendars. Most notably, The American Horse Winter Count pictured above depicts two American flags for the year 1805–1806, and this likely represents contact with the Lewis and Clark expedition which happened around that time. Do the flags stand for the two white men?
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Traditional war shields were decorated with power symbols.
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Placenta Flags

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Pawnee Sacred Bundle housed at Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site, Kansas Historical Society

Sacred Bundles

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Erica Lord (Athapaskan), Native American Land Reclamation Project (2000, 2010)American flags, dirt, sinew
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Photograph of Oglala warrior from Pine Ridge, SD, 1895

Secret Signals

Flag Codes and Dances

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Osage Iloshka Dance Lodge with Inverted American Flag, Pawhuska, Oklahoma Territory, 1890–1895

Inverted Flags

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American Indian Movement occupying Alcatraz (1969) and Wounded Knee (1972).
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The New Red Order, The Savage Philosophy of Endless Acknowledgement, performance by “informant” Laura Ortman at Whitney Museum June, 2018
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Greg Deal, Indigenous Flag, Acrylic on canvas, 2018
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Demian DinéYazhi and Noelle V. Sosaya, Untitled (Sovereignty) 2017, fabric and thread
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Demian DinéYazhi´ & Kali Spitzer. Resist White Supremacist Capitalist Patriarchal Colonization, 2016
Woven by: Bertha Harvey. “Flag Rug”, 1991
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Richard Ray Whitman, “States of Pervasive Indifference,” 1992, photograph
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Activists listen to speakers during the Indigenous People’s March on the National Mall at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, on January 18, 2019. GETTY IMAGES
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Fritz Scholder (Luiseño), “American Portrait with Flag,” 1979. Oil paint on canvas, 40 × 35 in.
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Harry Fonseca (Maidu), Shuffle Off to Buffalo #V, 1983, Acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 60inches tall by 48 inches wide
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Cannupa Hanska Luger (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian, and Norwegian), We Survive You (Work In Progress). 2019 packing blankets, felt, ceramic, hot water line, repurposed textiles, performance
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Santiago X (Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana (Koasati) and Indigenous Chamorro from the Island of Guam U.S.A (Hacha’Maori). “American Indian” 2018, Neon x Flag
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Annu Palakunnathu Matthew (Indian), Flags, 2005 Incjet print
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Brian Jungen (Dane-Zaa and Swiss), People’s Flag. 2006, textiles, 189 x 347 in.
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Jeffrey Gibson (Choctaw-Cherokee), Keep on Moving, 2019, Whitney Biennial
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Hans Haacke (German American), Star Gazing, 2004. Digital C-print mounted on aluminum
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The New Red Order, June 14, 2018, The Savage Philosophy of Endless Acknowledgement, performance at the Whitney Museum
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Painter and Art Instructor at Haskell Indian Nations University

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